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STEM Ed Announcement: MITS PD Programs



This is not a UMass program.
 Contact information is below.
 ==============================================       
 
 Berkshire Region
 Institute for Middle and High School Educators
 Going With the Flow: Using Inquiry Methods to Teach Watershed Science
 
 Rivers today and throughout history have formed the backdrop of New
 England communities. What affects water quality in rivers that flow
 through your community? How do scientists measure watershed health?
 Come get your feet wet as we visit local rivers and explore a variety
 of methods you can use with your students to explore a watershed! Build
 a SeaPerch - a working model of an underwater remotely operated vehicle
 (ROV) and use it with your students to video underwater ecosystems or
 collect water quality data at different points along the river.
 Identify indicator species and learn about local citizen monitoring
 programs to engage your students. Build on your newly acquired
 watershed knowledge and construct a miniature urban landscape and
 aquifer. Using your model, explore and develop methods for remediating
 runoff and put science and engineering design practices to work.
 Investigate current research on the rivers in New England, the impacts
 of dams and dam removal, PCB pollution remediation in the Housatonic
 River watershed and "low impact development" solutions to remediate
 non-point source pollution. Through inquiry-based, minds-on, hands-on
 activities and data analysis, you will develop ways to excite your
 students about their local rivers!
 
 Collaborators: Berkshire Museum, Housatonic Valley Association, Flying
 Cloud Institute
 Course Dates: July 6-10 (8:30-3:30); Introductory Session Saturday,
 June 20th (8:30-12:30) (Fall Callback date will be set during the
 institute)
 Registration Fee: $400/participant; $375/participant for 2 or more
 teachers from the same school district (registration cost includes a
 SeaPerch Kit)
 PDPs and Graduate Credit: Cambridge College, Massachusetts College of
 Liberal Arts (3 credits, 67.5 PDPs); 40 PDPs without graduate credit
 
 Cape Cod Region
 Institute for Grades 3-8 Educators
 Whale Tales and Seashore Sagas: Exploring the Marine Environment
 Through Inquiry and Literacy
 
 Investigate the connections between marine science, technology,
 engineering, math, and literacy as you explore Cape Cod's coastal
 environment. Muck around in a tidal mudflat, sample a saltmarsh, wander
 through woody upland, and view a vernal pond as you deepen your
 understanding of our local ecosystems. Learn about local wildlife,
 coastal habitats, and associated scientific research, then practice
 making literacy connections with naturalists and educators from Mass
 Audubon Long Pasture Wildlife Sanctuary and Thornton Burgess Society.
 Visit science laboratories in Woods Hole and a marine animal hospital
 in Buzzards Bay and witness some of the science and engineering
 involved in studying the ocean. Then, practice using literacy skills
 along with scientific inquiry and engineering design in hands-on
 investigations that you can take back to your classroom. Invigorate
 your science curriculum with exciting minds-on, hands-on
 interdisciplinary STEM investigations.
 
 Partners: National Marine Life Center, Massachusetts Maritime Academy,
 Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Thornton Burgess Society, Mass
 Audubon's Long Pasture Wildlife Sanctuary, Marine Biological Laboratory
 Course Dates: July 6-10 (8:30-3:30); Introductory Session Saturday,
 June 13th (8:30-12:30) (Fall Callback date will be set during the
 institute)
 Registration Fee: $350/participant; $325/participant for 2 or more
 teachers from the same school district
 PDPs and Graduate Credit: Cambridge College, Framingham State
 University (3 credits, 67.5 PDPs); 40 PDPs without graduate credit
 Housing is available for this region @ $30.00/night for a maximum of 4
 nights.
 
 North Shore Region
 Institute for Middle and High School Educators
 Research and Resiliency: Exploring the Ways Local Ecosystems are
 Responding to Our Changing Climate
 
 Explore coastal habitats along the North Shore and investigate the
 ecology of these environments. Come learn how scientists and land
 managers work together to protect and preserve the health of these
 local ecosystems. Coastal habitats are continually threatened by
 increased storm events, sea level rise, invasive species, coastal
 runoff and tidal restrictions. Learn how to determine and evaluate the
 health of an ecosystem, explore engineering solutions that could
 minimize the impacts of climate change to local habitats, and
 investigate how plants and organisms are adapting to life in a
 continually changing climate. Venture into the field with scientists
 and use a variety of scientific tools and techniques to collect and
 analyze field data. Learn how you can use data collection to engage
 your students and introduce them to scientific research and potential
 career opportunities. Each day will be filled with field trips,
 hands-on investigations and discussions aimed to highlight the
 resiliency of our local habitats.
 
 Collaborators: Mass Audubon's Endicott Wildlife Sanctuary, US Fish and
 Wildlife Service, Plum Island Ecosystems LTER, Ipswich River Watershed
 Association, University of New Hampshire
 Course Dates: July 13-17 (8:30-3:30); Introductory Session Saturday,
 June 20th (8:30-12:30) (Fall Callback date will be set during the
 institute)
 Registration Fee: $350/participant; $325/participant for 2 or more
 teachers from the same school district
 PDPs and Graduate Credit: Cambridge College, Framingham State
 University (3 credits, 67.5 PDPs); 40 PDPs without graduate credit
 
 
 
 
 Central Region
 Hybrid Institute for Middle and High School Educators
 Exploring Energy and Climate Change: Science, Systems and Solutions
 
 Take a broad view of the connections between energy and climate change
 as you sharpen your science and engineering design practices. Acquire
 the skills to make claims about weather and climate changes in your
 local region based on evidence!  Learn about weather/climate changes
 from the experts, and then identify sources from which you can access
 and analyze temperature and precipitation data in your own region. 
 Visit a science research center to explore the impacts these changes
 have on the ranges of plants and animals in the Northeast. Then
 identify citizen science programs you can engage in with your students
 to assist scientists with collecting data in species distribution,
 migration and other indicators of changes in our environment. Learn
 about connections between the health of the soil, an ecosystem and
 human populations through regenerative processes and how holistic
 management can address carbon challenges.  Tour an engineering site to
 view a variety of hydrokinetic turbine designs. Hear how engineers
 scrub emissions from fossil fuel plant stacks and address carbon
 sequestration. Design your own wind turbine blades and test their
 performance. Participate in activities that help you "think like a
 system" and role play community decision-making about energy policy.
 Synthesize all you learn both online and on-site by describing how your
 school system could address climate and energy concepts across the
 breadth of the curriculum and by creating investigations for your
 students to hone science and engineering practices while they deepen
 science content knowledge of energy and climate within Earth's systems.
 
 Collaborators: Alden Lab, Harvard Forest, National Oceanic and
 Atmospheric Administration
 Course Dates: June 22-August 7 on-line; July 13-17 on-site (9:00-3:30);
 On-site Introductory Session Saturday, June 13th
 (9:00-1:00) (Fall Callback date will be set during the institute)
 Registration Fee: $375/participant; $350/participant for 2 or more
 teachers from the same school district
 PDPs and Graduate Credit: Cambridge College, Framingham State
 University (4 credits, 90 PDPs); 50 PDPs without graduate Credit
 
 Metro-West Region
 Hybrid Institute for Grades 3-8 Educators
 Things That Move: How Scientists, Engineers and Artists Investigate
 Motion
 
 The speed, path, and patterns of moving things hold clues to exciting
 science concepts and practices! Join us as we explore how things move
 and discover inquiry-based investigations for bringing the science and
 engineering design practices into your classroom. At The Discovery
 Museums, we will explore the intersection of science and art as we
 experiment with things that move - from chemicals and fog, to pendulums
 and balls. See how artists have been inspired by
 their observations and try various artistic techniques to capture,
 interpret, and model these dynamic and often fleeting phenomena. At
 Mass Audubon, we will study how weather and wind affect living things--
 together, we will design and build sculptures to support an
 understanding of the mechanics of movement with wind as a source of
 power. Using a kinesthetic approach, we will model the motions of the
 universe at the Christa Corrigan McAuliffe Center. From planets that
 orbit their stars, to the collapse and outward bounce of a dying star,
 to the thermal motion of atoms and molecules, every component of the
 cosmos engages in a beautifully choreographed dance! Together we will
 explore what it takes to detect both very large scale and very small
 scale motions in our world and beyond.
 
 Partners: Mass Audubon's Drumlin Farm Wildlife Sanctuary, Christa
 Corrigan McAuliffe Center, The Discovery Museums Course Dates: June
 22-August 7 on-line; July 6-10 on-site (9:00-3:30); On-site
 Introductory Session Saturday, June 20th (9:00-1:00) (Fall Callback
 date will be set during the institute)
 Registration Fee: $375/participant; $350/participant for 2 or more
 teachers from the same school district
 PDPs and Graduate Credit: Cambridge College, Framingham State
 University (4 credits, 90 PDPs); 50 PDPs without graduate credit
 
 South Shore Region
 Hybrid Institute for Middle and High School Educators
 Wind, Water and Robotics: Bringing Together Physical Science, Life
 Science and Engineering Design
 
 Dive into learning about the science and technology used to explore the
 ocean environment and alternative energy resources. Discover
 connections between the life and physical sciences through a variety of
 tools, methods and technologies using engineering design and science
 practices. Build your own SeaPerch - a working model of a Remotely
 Operated Vehicle (ROV) to take back to your classroom. Then explore how
 you can hack your Sea Perch to perform a wide range of missions that
 include collecting biological data, observing underwater habitats,
 taking water samples at various depths and remediating environmental
 threats such as leaking oil wells. Explore cutting edge research on oil
 spills and their impact on wildlife, and then participate in an
 inquiry-based investigation to clean up a mock oil spill. Design your
 own wind turbine blades and test their performance. Learn how you can
 analyze this data using data collection software to excite your
 students about their local environment. Using on-line lessons and
 hands-on activities that demonstrate learning progressions and group
 discussions, you will explore ways to excite and educate your students
 about wind, water and robotics!
 
 Partners: Lloyd Center for the Environment, South Shore Natural Science
 Center, Blue Hill Observatory and Science Center, National Marine Life
 Center
 
 Course Dates: June 22-August 7 on-line; July 13-17 on-site (8:30-3:30);
 On-site Introductory Session Saturday, June 13th
 (9:00-1:00) (Fall Callback date will be set during the institute)
 Registration Fee: $425/participant; $400/participant for 2 or more
 teachers from the same school district (registration fee includes a
 SeaPerch Kit)
 
 PDPs and Graduate Credit: Cambridge College, Framingham State
 University (4 credits, 90 PDPs); 50 PDPs without graduate credit
 

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