Science & Engineering Saturday Seminars       Spring, 2011

-        Designed for science teachers; new teachers are especially welcome        

-        Five Saturdays each term; 8:30-1 at UMass Amherst, Lederle Grad Towers 1033 (except as noted)

-        Educational materials, refreshments, parking, PDP’s included

-              Advance registration is required; capacity is limited

-              Cost $30 per session, $120 for all five sessions

-        4 PDP’s per half day session; option for 3 grad credits at reduced cost with extra work

 

January 22.  Working with the Engineering Design Process. Thomas Gralinski, Smith College.  We will explore a number of inexpensive activities that enhance student understanding of the Engineering Design Process. We will work in small groups on multiple activities and briefly share our experiences with the groups doing the other activities.  The Engineering Design Process is a foundation skill that is applicable across all academic disciplines and has many similarities to the scientific method. Using its steps, students can solve technology/engineering problems and apply scientific and mathematical concepts across a wide variety of topics to develop a conceptual understanding.

January 29.  Weather cancellation makeup date if needed.

** Canceled due to bad weather (see April 2)** February 5. LEGO® MINDSTORMS® meets science class

  Paula Brault, Math, Pioneer Valley RHS.  Learn about a great way to teach engineering to Middle and High School students.  This cooperative learning program encourages students to design, create, program, and problem solve with LEGO’s in a science learning environment.  You will be introduced to “Wheels, Pulleys, Levers, and Gears, OH MY!” (A program of Girl Scouts of Central and Western Massachusetts) as well as build and program a robot that could lead your class to regional and national competitions.  

February 12. Colloids, Emulsions and Foams. Anthony Dinsmore, Physics. These materials are very common and are amenable to some nice demonstrations, yet are not part of the usual curriculum. Topics include surface tension (and why droplets are spherical; why shaving cream acts like a solid even though it's made of liquid and gas); Brownian motion; behavior of many particles (phase transitions, how colloidal particles can spontaneously order themselves as water molecules do to form ice); technological and biological importance (development of latex paint; inks; blood-cell sedimentation).

March 5. Mapping Nest Success in Migratory Birds: Dan Bisaccio, Science Education, Brown University.  GIS is made accessible to your students by using an authentic field-based context.  Students craft artificial nests and eggs (and you will too!) of migratory birds and investigate the impact of forest fragmentation on nesting success.  Locations of the nests are then mapped using GPS and nest disturbance analyzed using GIS. Through this hands-on field exercise students learn about global habitat connections and conservation issues for migratory birds.  Students as researchers may then share their data with other students around the country using HabitatNet (A Toyota Tapestry Grant Project).  Learn how to visualize nest disturbance data using GIS while creating a nest and eggs to take home with you.  

March 26. STEM DIGITAL. This is a “prequel” for a new 3-year NSF funded program of summer institutes designed to enable students and teachers to use digital images and computers to do original environmental science research. The program will explore topics in air and water quality and in arsenic contamination. See www.umassk12.net/digital for summer program information.

April 2. LEGO® MINDSTORMS® meets science class Paula Brault, Math, Pioneer Valley RHS. Learn about a great way to teach engineering to Middle and High School students. This cooperative learning program encourages students to design, create, program, and problem solve with LEGO.s in a science learning environment. You will be introduced to .Wheels, Pulleys, Levers, and Gears, OH MY!. (A program of Girl Scouts of Central and Western Massachusetts) as well as build and program a robot that could lead your class to regional and national competitions.

April 30. Recall for those registered for graduate credit. Hasbrouck Lab.

Graduate credit option: There is a charge of $300 for 3 Continuing Education credits plus a $45 registration fee. This is in addition to the $120 STEM Education Institute fee. Teachers may obtain credit for the seminar as many terms as they wish, but only 3 credits may be applied to UMass Amherst degrees. A lesson plan and a book report will be required for those enrolled for graduate credit. Register with Continuing Education or the UMass Graduate School for CNS 697T, ST-Contemporary Science and Engineering III. We will have registration forms at the first seminar.

Questions: Mort Sternheim, mort@umassk12.net, 413-545-1908, www.umassk12.net/sess

Online seminar registration and payment: http://www.umassk12.net/sess/register.html. Required for everyone whether or not they are registering for graduate credit.